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Conventions

This document uses the conventions described below.

IP addresses

To avoid IP conflicts that would occur if you used examples in this document with public IP addresses that belong to a real organization, the IP addresses used in this document are fictional. They belong to the private IP address ranges defined by these RFCs.

RFC 1918: Address Allocation for Private Internets

http://ietf.org/rfc/rfc1918.txt?number-1918

RFC 5737: IPv4 Address Blocks Reserved for Documentation

http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5737

RFC 3849: IPv6 Address Prefix Reserved for Documentation

http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3849

For example, even though a real network’s Internet-facing IP address would be routable on the public Internet, in this document’s examples, the IP address would be shown as a non-Internet-routable IP such as 10.0.0.1, 192.168.0.1, or 172.16.0.1.

Cautions, notes, & tips

This document uses the following guidance and styles for notes, tips and cautions.

Warns you about procedures or feature behaviors that could have unexpected or undesirable results including loss of data or damage to equipment.

 

Highlights important, possibly unexpected but non-destructive, details about a feature’s behavior.

 

Presents best practices, troubleshooting, performance tips, or alternative methods.

Typographical conventions

This document uses the following typefaces to indicate items such as code or button names.

Typographical conventions in this document
Convention Example
Button, menu, text box, field, or check box label From Minimum log level, select Notification.
CLI input

config system dns

set primary <address_ipv4>

end

CLI output

FortiWeb# diagnose hardware logdisk info

disk number: 1

disk[0] size: 31.46GB

raid level: no raid exists

partition number: 1

mount status: read-write

Emphasis HTTP connections are not secure and can be intercepted by a third party.
File content <HTML><HEAD><TITLE>Firewall Authentication</TITLE></HEAD>
<BODY><H4>You must authenticate to use this service.</H4></BODY></HTML>
Hyperlink https://support.fortinet.com
Keyboard entry Type the IP address or domain name of an NTP server or pool, such as pool.ntp.org.
Navigation Go to System > Status > Status.
Publication For details, see the FortiWeb Administration Guide.

Command syntax conventions

The command line interface (CLI) requires that you use valid syntax, and conform to expected input constraints. It will reject invalid commands.

Brackets, braces, and pipes are used to denote valid permutations of the syntax. Constraint notations, such as <address_ipv4>, indicate which data types or string patterns are acceptable value input.

Command syntax notation
Convention Description
Square brackets [ ]

A non-required (optional) word or words. For example:

[verbose {1 | 2 | 3}]

indicates that you may either omit or type both the verbose word and its accompanying option, such as:

verbose 3

Curly braces { }

A word or series of words that is constrained to a set of options delimited by either vertical bars or spaces.

You must enter at least one of the options, unless the set of options is surrounded by square brackets [ ].

  Options delimited by vertical bars |

Mutually exclusive options. For example:

{enable | disable}

indicates that you must enter either enable or disable, but must not enter both.

  Options delimited by spaces

Non-mutually exclusive options. For example:

{http https ping snmp ssh telnet}

indicates that you may enter all or a subset of those options, in any order, in a space-delimited list, such as:

ping https ssh

   

Note: To change the options, you must re-type the entire list. For example, to add snmp to the previous example, you would type:

ping https snmp ssh

If the option adds to or subtracts from the existing list of options, instead of replacing it, or if the list is comma-delimited, the exception will be noted.

Angle brackets < >

A word constrained by data type.

To define acceptable input, the angled brackets contain a descriptive name followed by an underscore ( _ ) and suffix that indicates the valid data type. For example:

<retries_int>

indicates that you should enter a number of retries, such as 5.

Data types include:

  • <xxx_name> — A name referring to another part of the configuration, such as policy_A.
  • <xxx_index> — An index number referring to another part of the configuration, such as 0 for the first static route.
   
  • <xxx_pattern> — A regular expression or word with wild cards that matches possible variations, such as *@example.com to match all e-mail addresses ending in @example.com.
  • <xxx_fqdn> — A fully qualified domain name (FQDN), such as mail.example.com.
  • <xxx_email> — An email address, such as admin@mail.example.com.
  • <xxx_url> — A uniform resource locator (URL) and its associated protocol and host name prefix, which together form a uniform resource identifier (URI), such as http://www.fortinet.com/.
  • <xxx_ipv4> — An IPv4 address, such as 192.168.1.99.
   
  • <xxx_v4mask> — A dotted decimal IPv4 netmask, such as 255.255.255.0.
  • <xxx_ipv4mask> — A dotted decimal IPv4 address and netmask separated by a space, such as 192.168.1.99 255.255.255.0.
  • <xxx_ipv4/mask> — A dotted decimal IPv4 address and CIDR-notation netmask separated by a slash, such as such as 192.168.1.99/24.
  • <xxx_ipv6> — A colon( : )-delimited hexadecimal IPv6 address, such as 3f2e:6a8b:78a3:0d82:1725:6a2f:0370:6234.
  • <xxx_v6mask> — An IPv6 netmask, such as /96.
  • <xxx_ipv6mask> — An IPv6 address and netmask separated by a space.
   
  • <xxx_str> — A string of characters that is not another data type, such as P@ssw0rd. Strings containing spaces or special characters must be surrounded in quotes or use escape sequences. See the FortiWeb CLI Reference.
  • <xxx_int> — An integer number that is not another data type, such as 15 for the number of minutes.

Conventions

This document uses the conventions described below.

IP addresses

To avoid IP conflicts that would occur if you used examples in this document with public IP addresses that belong to a real organization, the IP addresses used in this document are fictional. They belong to the private IP address ranges defined by these RFCs.

RFC 1918: Address Allocation for Private Internets

http://ietf.org/rfc/rfc1918.txt?number-1918

RFC 5737: IPv4 Address Blocks Reserved for Documentation

http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5737

RFC 3849: IPv6 Address Prefix Reserved for Documentation

http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3849

For example, even though a real network’s Internet-facing IP address would be routable on the public Internet, in this document’s examples, the IP address would be shown as a non-Internet-routable IP such as 10.0.0.1, 192.168.0.1, or 172.16.0.1.

Cautions, notes, & tips

This document uses the following guidance and styles for notes, tips and cautions.

Warns you about procedures or feature behaviors that could have unexpected or undesirable results including loss of data or damage to equipment.

 

Highlights important, possibly unexpected but non-destructive, details about a feature’s behavior.

 

Presents best practices, troubleshooting, performance tips, or alternative methods.

Typographical conventions

This document uses the following typefaces to indicate items such as code or button names.

Typographical conventions in this document
Convention Example
Button, menu, text box, field, or check box label From Minimum log level, select Notification.
CLI input

config system dns

set primary <address_ipv4>

end

CLI output

FortiWeb# diagnose hardware logdisk info

disk number: 1

disk[0] size: 31.46GB

raid level: no raid exists

partition number: 1

mount status: read-write

Emphasis HTTP connections are not secure and can be intercepted by a third party.
File content <HTML><HEAD><TITLE>Firewall Authentication</TITLE></HEAD>
<BODY><H4>You must authenticate to use this service.</H4></BODY></HTML>
Hyperlink https://support.fortinet.com
Keyboard entry Type the IP address or domain name of an NTP server or pool, such as pool.ntp.org.
Navigation Go to System > Status > Status.
Publication For details, see the FortiWeb Administration Guide.

Command syntax conventions

The command line interface (CLI) requires that you use valid syntax, and conform to expected input constraints. It will reject invalid commands.

Brackets, braces, and pipes are used to denote valid permutations of the syntax. Constraint notations, such as <address_ipv4>, indicate which data types or string patterns are acceptable value input.

Command syntax notation
Convention Description
Square brackets [ ]

A non-required (optional) word or words. For example:

[verbose {1 | 2 | 3}]

indicates that you may either omit or type both the verbose word and its accompanying option, such as:

verbose 3

Curly braces { }

A word or series of words that is constrained to a set of options delimited by either vertical bars or spaces.

You must enter at least one of the options, unless the set of options is surrounded by square brackets [ ].

  Options delimited by vertical bars |

Mutually exclusive options. For example:

{enable | disable}

indicates that you must enter either enable or disable, but must not enter both.

  Options delimited by spaces

Non-mutually exclusive options. For example:

{http https ping snmp ssh telnet}

indicates that you may enter all or a subset of those options, in any order, in a space-delimited list, such as:

ping https ssh

   

Note: To change the options, you must re-type the entire list. For example, to add snmp to the previous example, you would type:

ping https snmp ssh

If the option adds to or subtracts from the existing list of options, instead of replacing it, or if the list is comma-delimited, the exception will be noted.

Angle brackets < >

A word constrained by data type.

To define acceptable input, the angled brackets contain a descriptive name followed by an underscore ( _ ) and suffix that indicates the valid data type. For example:

<retries_int>

indicates that you should enter a number of retries, such as 5.

Data types include:

  • <xxx_name> — A name referring to another part of the configuration, such as policy_A.
  • <xxx_index> — An index number referring to another part of the configuration, such as 0 for the first static route.
   
  • <xxx_pattern> — A regular expression or word with wild cards that matches possible variations, such as *@example.com to match all e-mail addresses ending in @example.com.
  • <xxx_fqdn> — A fully qualified domain name (FQDN), such as mail.example.com.
  • <xxx_email> — An email address, such as admin@mail.example.com.
  • <xxx_url> — A uniform resource locator (URL) and its associated protocol and host name prefix, which together form a uniform resource identifier (URI), such as http://www.fortinet.com/.
  • <xxx_ipv4> — An IPv4 address, such as 192.168.1.99.
   
  • <xxx_v4mask> — A dotted decimal IPv4 netmask, such as 255.255.255.0.
  • <xxx_ipv4mask> — A dotted decimal IPv4 address and netmask separated by a space, such as 192.168.1.99 255.255.255.0.
  • <xxx_ipv4/mask> — A dotted decimal IPv4 address and CIDR-notation netmask separated by a slash, such as such as 192.168.1.99/24.
  • <xxx_ipv6> — A colon( : )-delimited hexadecimal IPv6 address, such as 3f2e:6a8b:78a3:0d82:1725:6a2f:0370:6234.
  • <xxx_v6mask> — An IPv6 netmask, such as /96.
  • <xxx_ipv6mask> — An IPv6 address and netmask separated by a space.
   
  • <xxx_str> — A string of characters that is not another data type, such as P@ssw0rd. Strings containing spaces or special characters must be surrounded in quotes or use escape sequences. See the FortiWeb CLI Reference.
  • <xxx_int> — An integer number that is not another data type, such as 15 for the number of minutes.