Fortinet Document Library

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:


Table of Contents

Administration Guide

Defining security policies

Security policies allow IP traffic to pass between interfaces on a FortiGate unit. You can limit communication to particular traffic by specifying source and destination addresses. Then only traffic from those addresses will be allowed.

Policy-based and route-based VPNs require different security policies.

A policy-based VPN requires an IPsec security policy. You specify the interface to the private network, the interface to the remote peer and the VPN tunnel. A single policy can enable traffic inbound, outbound, or in both directions.

A route-based VPN requires an Accept security policy for each direction. As source and destination interfaces, you specify the interface to the private network and the virtual IPsec interface of the VPN. The IPsec interface is the destination interface for the outbound policy and the source interface for the inbound policy. One security policy must be configured for each direction of each VPN interface.

If the security policy that grants the VPN connection is limited to certain services, DHCP must be included, otherwise the client will not be able to retrieve a lease from the FortiGate’s (IPsec) DHCP server because the DHCP request (coming out of the tunnel) will be blocked.

Before you define the IPsec policy, you must:

  • Define the IP source and destination addresses.
  • Specify the phase 1 authentication parameters.
  • Specify the phase 2 parameters.
  • Create a VPN Tunnel dynamic object (policy-based VPNs only).

You must define at least one IPsec policy for each VPN tunnel. If the same remote server or client requires access to more than one network behind a local FortiGate unit, the FortiGate unit must be configured with an IPsec policy for each network. Multiple policies may be required to configure redundant connections to a remote destination or control access to different services at different times.

To ensure a secure connection, the FortiGate unit must evaluate IPSEC policies before ACCEPT and DENY security policies. Because the FortiGate unit reads policies starting at the top of the list, you must move all IPsec policies to the top of the list. When you define multiple IPsec policies for the same tunnel, you must reorder the IPsec policies that apply to the tunnel so that specific constraints can be evaluated before general constraints.

When you define a route-based VPN, you create a virtual IPsec interface on the physical interface that connects to the remote peer. You create ordinary Accept security policies to enable traffic between the IPsec interface and the interface that connects to the private network. This makes configuration simpler than for policy-based VPNs, which require IPsec security policies.

See Managing policies for information on creating policies on your FortiManager.

Defining security policies

Security policies allow IP traffic to pass between interfaces on a FortiGate unit. You can limit communication to particular traffic by specifying source and destination addresses. Then only traffic from those addresses will be allowed.

Policy-based and route-based VPNs require different security policies.

A policy-based VPN requires an IPsec security policy. You specify the interface to the private network, the interface to the remote peer and the VPN tunnel. A single policy can enable traffic inbound, outbound, or in both directions.

A route-based VPN requires an Accept security policy for each direction. As source and destination interfaces, you specify the interface to the private network and the virtual IPsec interface of the VPN. The IPsec interface is the destination interface for the outbound policy and the source interface for the inbound policy. One security policy must be configured for each direction of each VPN interface.

If the security policy that grants the VPN connection is limited to certain services, DHCP must be included, otherwise the client will not be able to retrieve a lease from the FortiGate’s (IPsec) DHCP server because the DHCP request (coming out of the tunnel) will be blocked.

Before you define the IPsec policy, you must:

  • Define the IP source and destination addresses.
  • Specify the phase 1 authentication parameters.
  • Specify the phase 2 parameters.
  • Create a VPN Tunnel dynamic object (policy-based VPNs only).

You must define at least one IPsec policy for each VPN tunnel. If the same remote server or client requires access to more than one network behind a local FortiGate unit, the FortiGate unit must be configured with an IPsec policy for each network. Multiple policies may be required to configure redundant connections to a remote destination or control access to different services at different times.

To ensure a secure connection, the FortiGate unit must evaluate IPSEC policies before ACCEPT and DENY security policies. Because the FortiGate unit reads policies starting at the top of the list, you must move all IPsec policies to the top of the list. When you define multiple IPsec policies for the same tunnel, you must reorder the IPsec policies that apply to the tunnel so that specific constraints can be evaluated before general constraints.

When you define a route-based VPN, you create a virtual IPsec interface on the physical interface that connects to the remote peer. You create ordinary Accept security policies to enable traffic between the IPsec interface and the interface that connects to the private network. This makes configuration simpler than for policy-based VPNs, which require IPsec security policies.

See Managing policies for information on creating policies on your FortiManager.