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Administration Guide

Wildcard addressing

Wildcard addresses are addresses that identify ranges of IP addresses, reducing the amount of firewall addresses and security policies required to match some of the traffic on your network. Wildcard addresses are an advanced feature, usually required only for complex networks with complex firewall filtering requirements. By using these wildcard addresses in the firewall configuration, administrators can eliminate creating multiple, separate IP based address objects and then grouping them to then apply to multiple security policies.

A wildcard address consists of an IP address and a wildcard netmask, for example, 192.168.0.56 255.255.0.255. In this example, the IP address is 192.168.0.56 and the wildcard netmask is 255.255.0.255. The IP address defines the networks to match and the wildcard netmask defines the specific addresses to match on these networks.

In a wildcard netmask, zero denotes ignoring the value of the octet in the IP address. This means the wildcard firewall address matches any number in this address octet. This also means that the number included in this octet of IP address is ignored and can be any number. Usually, if the octet in the wildcard netmask is zero, the corresponding octet in the IP address is also zero.

In a wildcard netmask, a number denotes matching addresses according to how the numbers translate into binary addresses. For example, the wildcard netmask is 255; the wildcard address will only match addresses with the value for this octet that is in the IP address part of the wildcard address. So, if the first octet of the IP address is 192 and the first octet of the wildcard netmask is 255, the wildcard address will only match addresses with 192 in the first octet.

In the above example, the wildcard address 192.168.0.56 255.255.0.255 would match the following IP addresses:

192.168.0.56
192.168.1.56
192.168.2.56
...
192.168.255.56

The wildcard addresses 192.168.0.56 255.255.0.255 and 192.168.1.56 255.255.0.255 define the same thing since the 0 in the wildcard mask means to match any address in the third octet.

The following is an example of how to configure a wildcard firewall address.

config firewall address
    edit example_wildcard_address
        set type wildcard
        set wildcard 192.168.0.56 255.255.0.255
    next
end
Note

Wildcard firewall addresses are initially configured in the CLI. You cannot choose wildcard in the GUI when creating the address, but after the address is created in the CLI, it will show up in the GUI. The Type field shows a grayed-out value of Wildcard and the settings, other than the Type, can be edited.

Wildcard addresses are addresses that identify ranges of IP addresses, reducing the amount of firewall addresses and security policies required to match some of the traffic on your network. Wildcard addresses are an advanced feature, usually required only for complex networks with complex firewall filtering requirements. By using these wildcard addresses in the firewall configuration, administrators can eliminate creating multiple, separate IP based address objects and then grouping them to then apply to multiple security policies.

A wildcard address consists of an IP address and a wildcard netmask, for example, 192.168.0.56 255.255.0.255. In this example, the IP address is 192.168.0.56 and the wildcard netmask is 255.255.0.255. The IP address defines the networks to match and the wildcard netmask defines the specific addresses to match on these networks.

In a wildcard netmask, zero denotes ignoring the value of the octet in the IP address. This means the wildcard firewall address matches any number in this address octet. This also means that the number included in this octet of IP address is ignored and can be any number. Usually, if the octet in the wildcard netmask is zero, the corresponding octet in the IP address is also zero.

In a wildcard netmask, a number denotes matching addresses according to how the numbers translate into binary addresses. For example, the wildcard netmask is 255; the wildcard address will only match addresses with the value for this octet that is in the IP address part of the wildcard address. So, if the first octet of the IP address is 192 and the first octet of the wildcard netmask is 255, the wildcard address will only match addresses with 192 in the first octet.

In the above example, the wildcard address 192.168.0.56 255.255.0.255 would match the following IP addresses:

192.168.0.56
192.168.1.56
192.168.2.56
...
192.168.255.56

The wildcard addresses 192.168.0.56 255.255.0.255 and 192.168.1.56 255.255.0.255 define the same thing since the 0 in the wildcard mask means to match any address in the third octet.

The following is an example of how to configure a wildcard firewall address.

config firewall address
    edit example_wildcard_address
        set type wildcard
        set wildcard 192.168.0.56 255.255.0.255
    next
end
Note

Wildcard firewall addresses are initially configured in the CLI. You cannot choose wildcard in the GUI when creating the address, but after the address is created in the CLI, it will show up in the GUI. The Type field shows a grayed-out value of Wildcard and the settings, other than the Type, can be edited.