Fortinet Document Library

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:

Version:


Table of Contents

Hardware Acceleration

Increasing NP7 offloading capacity using link aggregation groups (LAGs)

NP7 processors can offload sessions received by interfaces in link aggregation groups (LAGs) (IEEE 802.3ad). A 802.3ad Link Aggregation and it's management protocol, Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) LAG combines more than one physical interface into a group that functions like a single interface with a higher capacity than a single physical interface. For example, you could use a LAG if you want to offload sessions on a 100 Gbps link by adding four 25-Gbps interfaces to the same LAG.

All offloaded traffic types are supported by LAGs. Just like with normal interfaces, traffic accepted by a LAG is offloaded by the NP7 processor connected to the interfaces in the LAG that receive the traffic to be offloaded. If all interfaces in a LAG are connected to the same NP7 processor, traffic received by that LAG is offloaded by that NP7 processor. The amount of traffic that can be offloaded is limited by the capacity of the NP7 processor.

If a FortiGate has two or more NP7 processors connected by an integrated switch fabric (ISF), you can use LAGs to increase offloading by sharing the traffic load across multiple NP7 processors. You do this by adding physical interfaces connected to different NP7 processors to the same LAG.

Adding a second NP7 processor to a LAG effectively doubles the offloading capacity of the LAG. Adding a third further increases offloading. The actual increase in offloading capacity may not actually be doubled by adding a second NP7 or tripled by adding a third. Traffic and load conditions and other factors may limit the actual offloading result.

The increase in offloading capacity offered by LAGs and multiple NP7s is supported by the integrated switch fabric (ISF) that allows multiple NP7 processors to share session information.

There is also the following limitation to LAG NP7 offloading support for IPsec VPN:

  • Because the encrypted traffic for one IPsec VPN tunnel has the same 5-tuple, the traffic from one tunnel can only can be balanced to one interface in a LAG. This limits the maximum throughput for one IPsec VPN tunnel in an NP7 LAG group to 100Gbps (since each NP7 is connected to the ISF using two 100Gbps interfaces).

Increasing NP7 offloading capacity using link aggregation groups (LAGs)

NP7 processors can offload sessions received by interfaces in link aggregation groups (LAGs) (IEEE 802.3ad). A 802.3ad Link Aggregation and it's management protocol, Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) LAG combines more than one physical interface into a group that functions like a single interface with a higher capacity than a single physical interface. For example, you could use a LAG if you want to offload sessions on a 100 Gbps link by adding four 25-Gbps interfaces to the same LAG.

All offloaded traffic types are supported by LAGs. Just like with normal interfaces, traffic accepted by a LAG is offloaded by the NP7 processor connected to the interfaces in the LAG that receive the traffic to be offloaded. If all interfaces in a LAG are connected to the same NP7 processor, traffic received by that LAG is offloaded by that NP7 processor. The amount of traffic that can be offloaded is limited by the capacity of the NP7 processor.

If a FortiGate has two or more NP7 processors connected by an integrated switch fabric (ISF), you can use LAGs to increase offloading by sharing the traffic load across multiple NP7 processors. You do this by adding physical interfaces connected to different NP7 processors to the same LAG.

Adding a second NP7 processor to a LAG effectively doubles the offloading capacity of the LAG. Adding a third further increases offloading. The actual increase in offloading capacity may not actually be doubled by adding a second NP7 or tripled by adding a third. Traffic and load conditions and other factors may limit the actual offloading result.

The increase in offloading capacity offered by LAGs and multiple NP7s is supported by the integrated switch fabric (ISF) that allows multiple NP7 processors to share session information.

There is also the following limitation to LAG NP7 offloading support for IPsec VPN:

  • Because the encrypted traffic for one IPsec VPN tunnel has the same 5-tuple, the traffic from one tunnel can only can be balanced to one interface in a LAG. This limits the maximum throughput for one IPsec VPN tunnel in an NP7 LAG group to 100Gbps (since each NP7 is connected to the ISF using two 100Gbps interfaces).