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Table of Contents

FortiOS Carrier

When to use encapsulated IP traffic filtering

The following are the typical cases that need encapsulated IP traffic filtering:

Mobile station IP pools

In a well-designed network, best practices dictate that the mobile station address pool is to be completely separate from the GPRS network infrastructure range of addresses. Encapsulated IP packets originating from a mobile station will not contain source or destination addresses that fall within the address range of GPRS infrastructures. In addition, traffic originating from the users handset will not have destination/source IP addresses that fall within any Network Management System (NMS) or Charging Gateway (CG) networks.

Communication between mobile stations

Mobile stations on the same GPRS network are not able to communicate with other mobile stations. Best practices dictate that packets containing both source and destination addresses within the mobile station's range of addresses are to be dropped.

Direct mobile device or internet attacks

It may be possible for attackers to wrap attack traffic in GTP protocols and submit the resulting GTP traffic directly to a GPRS network element from their mobile stations or a node on the Internet. It is possible that the receiving SGSN or GGSN would then strip off the GTP header and attempt to route the underlying attack. This underlying attack could have any destination address and would probably have a source address spoofed as if it were valid from that PLMN.

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Relayed network attacks

Depending on the destination the attack could be directly routed, such as to another node of the PLMN, or re wrapped in GTP for transmission to any destination on the Internet outside the PLMN depending on the routing table of the GSN enlisted as the unwitting relay.

The relayed attack could have any source or destination addresses and could be any of numerous IP network attacks, such as an attack to hijack a PDP context, or a direct attack against a management interface of a GSN or other device within the PLMN. Best practices dictate that any IP traffic originating on the Internet or from an MS with a destination address within the PLMN is to be filtered.

When to use encapsulated IP traffic filtering

The following are the typical cases that need encapsulated IP traffic filtering:

Mobile station IP pools

In a well-designed network, best practices dictate that the mobile station address pool is to be completely separate from the GPRS network infrastructure range of addresses. Encapsulated IP packets originating from a mobile station will not contain source or destination addresses that fall within the address range of GPRS infrastructures. In addition, traffic originating from the users handset will not have destination/source IP addresses that fall within any Network Management System (NMS) or Charging Gateway (CG) networks.

Communication between mobile stations

Mobile stations on the same GPRS network are not able to communicate with other mobile stations. Best practices dictate that packets containing both source and destination addresses within the mobile station's range of addresses are to be dropped.

Direct mobile device or internet attacks

It may be possible for attackers to wrap attack traffic in GTP protocols and submit the resulting GTP traffic directly to a GPRS network element from their mobile stations or a node on the Internet. It is possible that the receiving SGSN or GGSN would then strip off the GTP header and attempt to route the underlying attack. This underlying attack could have any destination address and would probably have a source address spoofed as if it were valid from that PLMN.

caution icon You cannot add an IE removal policy when you are creating a new profile.

Relayed network attacks

Depending on the destination the attack could be directly routed, such as to another node of the PLMN, or re wrapped in GTP for transmission to any destination on the Internet outside the PLMN depending on the routing table of the GSN enlisted as the unwitting relay.

The relayed attack could have any source or destination addresses and could be any of numerous IP network attacks, such as an attack to hijack a PDP context, or a direct attack against a management interface of a GSN or other device within the PLMN. Best practices dictate that any IP traffic originating on the Internet or from an MS with a destination address within the PLMN is to be filtered.