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Hardware Acceleration

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NP7 acceleration

Note

The features described in this chapter are supported by the FortiGate-1800F and 1801F running FortiOS 6.0.9 build 6778.

NP7 network processors provide fastpath acceleration by offloading communication sessions from the FortiGate CPU. When the first packet of a new session is received by an interface connected to an NP7 processor, just like any session connecting with any FortiGate interface, the session is forwarded to the FortiGate CPU where it is matched with a security policy. If the session is accepted by a firewall policy and if the session can be offloaded its session key is copied to the NP7 processor that received the packet. All of the rest of the packets in the session are intercepted by the NP7 processor and fast-pathed to their destination without ever passing through the FortiGate CPU. The result is enhanced network performance provided by the NP7 processor plus the network processing load is removed from the CPU. In addition the NP7 processor can handle some CPU intensive tasks, like IPsec VPN encryption/decryption.

If the session is accepted by a firewall policy, and if the session can be offloaded, its session key is stored in the session table of the NP7 that received the session. All of the rest of the packets in the session are intercepted by the NP7 processor and fast-pathed out of the FortiGate unit to their destination. The result is enhanced connection per second (CPS) and network throughput performance provided by the NP7 processor plus the network processing load is removed from the CPU.

In addition, the NP7 processor can handle some CPU intensive tasks, like IPsec encryption/decryption.

In FortiGate with multiple NP7s, session keys (and IPsec SA keys) are stored in the memory of the NP7 processor that is connected to the interface that received the packet that started the session. All sessions are fast-pathed and accelerated, even if they exit the FortiGate unit through an interface connected to another NP7. There is no dependence on getting the right pair of interfaces since the offloading is done by the receiving NP7.

The key to making this possible is an Integrated Switch Fabric (ISF) that connects the NP7s and the FortiGate interfaces together. The ISF allows any interface connectivity with any NP7 on the same ISF. There are no special ingress and egress fast path requirements as long as traffic enters and exits on interfaces connected to the same ISF.

Each NP7 has a maximum throughput of 200 Gbps using two 100-Gigabit interfaces. Some FortiGates with NP7 processors also support creating NP7 port maps, allowing you to map data interfaces to specific NP7 100G interfaces. This feature allows you to control the balance traffic between the NP7 interfaces.

There is one limitation to keep in mind:

  • The capacity of the NP7 processor. An individual NP7 processor can support up to 12 million sessions. This number is limited by the amount of memory the processor has. Once an NP7 processor hits its session limit, sessions that are over the limit are sent to the CPU. You can avoid this problem by as much as possible distributing incoming sessions evenly among multiple NP7 processors. To be able to do this you need to be aware of which interfaces connect to which NP7 processors and distribute incoming traffic accordingly.

NP7 acceleration

Note

The features described in this chapter are supported by the FortiGate-1800F and 1801F running FortiOS 6.0.9 build 6778.

NP7 network processors provide fastpath acceleration by offloading communication sessions from the FortiGate CPU. When the first packet of a new session is received by an interface connected to an NP7 processor, just like any session connecting with any FortiGate interface, the session is forwarded to the FortiGate CPU where it is matched with a security policy. If the session is accepted by a firewall policy and if the session can be offloaded its session key is copied to the NP7 processor that received the packet. All of the rest of the packets in the session are intercepted by the NP7 processor and fast-pathed to their destination without ever passing through the FortiGate CPU. The result is enhanced network performance provided by the NP7 processor plus the network processing load is removed from the CPU. In addition the NP7 processor can handle some CPU intensive tasks, like IPsec VPN encryption/decryption.

If the session is accepted by a firewall policy, and if the session can be offloaded, its session key is stored in the session table of the NP7 that received the session. All of the rest of the packets in the session are intercepted by the NP7 processor and fast-pathed out of the FortiGate unit to their destination. The result is enhanced connection per second (CPS) and network throughput performance provided by the NP7 processor plus the network processing load is removed from the CPU.

In addition, the NP7 processor can handle some CPU intensive tasks, like IPsec encryption/decryption.

In FortiGate with multiple NP7s, session keys (and IPsec SA keys) are stored in the memory of the NP7 processor that is connected to the interface that received the packet that started the session. All sessions are fast-pathed and accelerated, even if they exit the FortiGate unit through an interface connected to another NP7. There is no dependence on getting the right pair of interfaces since the offloading is done by the receiving NP7.

The key to making this possible is an Integrated Switch Fabric (ISF) that connects the NP7s and the FortiGate interfaces together. The ISF allows any interface connectivity with any NP7 on the same ISF. There are no special ingress and egress fast path requirements as long as traffic enters and exits on interfaces connected to the same ISF.

Each NP7 has a maximum throughput of 200 Gbps using two 100-Gigabit interfaces. Some FortiGates with NP7 processors also support creating NP7 port maps, allowing you to map data interfaces to specific NP7 100G interfaces. This feature allows you to control the balance traffic between the NP7 interfaces.

There is one limitation to keep in mind:

  • The capacity of the NP7 processor. An individual NP7 processor can support up to 12 million sessions. This number is limited by the amount of memory the processor has. Once an NP7 processor hits its session limit, sessions that are over the limit are sent to the CPU. You can avoid this problem by as much as possible distributing incoming sessions evenly among multiple NP7 processors. To be able to do this you need to be aware of which interfaces connect to which NP7 processors and distribute incoming traffic accordingly.