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Handbook

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Certificate guidelines

When a client browser requests an HTTPS connection to a web server, the server presents a server certificate to the client for verification. The client checks the content of the certificate against a local browser database of Certificate Authorities, and if it finds a match, the connection is made. If no match is found, the browser displays a warning that asks if you want to continue with the connection.

To avoid this warning, you must upload an Intermediate CA signed by one of the CA vendors that has its root certificates preinstalled in the web browsers. When the vendor issues you a local server certificate for your website, it typically includes the Intermediate CAs in your package.

For SSL offloading deployments, you create a local certificate group that references the local certificate for the server and its Intermediate CA group (a group that references all Intermediate CAs the vendor provided with your certificate package).

For SSL decryption by forward proxy deployments, you create a local certificate group that references any local certificate and an Intermediate CA group that includes the Intermediate CA and private key configuration you have provisioned for the SSL forward proxy operations.

You are not required to obtain SSL certificates from SSL vendors. You can use an enterprise certificate server (like Microsoft CertSrv) or open-source tools like OpenSSL or to generate them. Note, however, that a web browser will not trust the certificate unless it is associated with a certificate installed in the browser. If you use your own tools to generate the Intermediate CA, you must distribute that certificate to client browsers in whatever manner you typically do that—automatic update package from IT, manual distribution, and so on.

For information on importing certificates and configuring certificate configuration objects, see Manage and validate certificates.

Certificate guidelines

When a client browser requests an HTTPS connection to a web server, the server presents a server certificate to the client for verification. The client checks the content of the certificate against a local browser database of Certificate Authorities, and if it finds a match, the connection is made. If no match is found, the browser displays a warning that asks if you want to continue with the connection.

To avoid this warning, you must upload an Intermediate CA signed by one of the CA vendors that has its root certificates preinstalled in the web browsers. When the vendor issues you a local server certificate for your website, it typically includes the Intermediate CAs in your package.

For SSL offloading deployments, you create a local certificate group that references the local certificate for the server and its Intermediate CA group (a group that references all Intermediate CAs the vendor provided with your certificate package).

For SSL decryption by forward proxy deployments, you create a local certificate group that references any local certificate and an Intermediate CA group that includes the Intermediate CA and private key configuration you have provisioned for the SSL forward proxy operations.

You are not required to obtain SSL certificates from SSL vendors. You can use an enterprise certificate server (like Microsoft CertSrv) or open-source tools like OpenSSL or to generate them. Note, however, that a web browser will not trust the certificate unless it is associated with a certificate installed in the browser. If you use your own tools to generate the Intermediate CA, you must distribute that certificate to client browsers in whatever manner you typically do that—automatic update package from IT, manual distribution, and so on.

For information on importing certificates and configuring certificate configuration objects, see Manage and validate certificates.